Henrician Launches on Myfonts!

After much development, testing and previewing, our Henrician family has launched on Myfonts.com

Henrician can claim two sources of inspiration. One of these was a set of beautiful capital letterforms seen on the cover of a 19th century album of engravings. The engravings contained therein depicted lovely examples of half-timbered Tudor architecture and there was a clear ‘Tudor’ intent behind the letterforms. The second source of inspiration is more conceptual-the title lettering of period films from the 30’s to the 60’s…think if the opening text when Errol Flynn plays Robin Hood, or think of Richard the Lionheart, or even that great comedy Classic ‘Carry on Henry’, and it’s discussion of Sir Thomas de Cobbler….but we digress! Henrician is a set of eight display and text (but perhaps not Body Text) faces in a ‘Tudor Revival’ spirit. Like any good revival design they are somehow at home with a wide range period themed design work, covering the medieval until, perhaps, the 18th century, just so long as we’re more concerned with fun and appearance than strict historical accuracy. The family will be at home in the realms of advertising, posters, cover design and web design. Try Henrician out today!

Here are display banners for each of the eight members of the family….and a few others besides:

Henrician_Poster1 Henrician_Poster2 Henrician_Poster3 Henrician_Poster4 Henrician_Poster5 Henrician_Poster6 Henrician_Poster7 Henrician_Poster8 Henrician_Poster9 Henrician_Poster10 Henrician_Poster11 Henrician_Poster12

Testing Some More

Here are three more test pieces showing off the Henrecian family, as we refine our letterforms, spacing and kerning.  It’s interesting to note that a design like this, done in a deliberate ‘revival’ style, is equality at home in poster work inspired by many different periods- as we see here with a 1950s styled travel poster, a design inspired by the early days of motoring and a poster for the Royal York hotel in splendid 1930s style.

Henrician_Gallery4 Henrician_Gallery5 Henrician_Gallery6

Just Wonderful!

We happened across this wonderful set of letters, and amazing approach to design earlier this week.  We can’t help but admire Sabeena Karnik’s wonderful quilled paper capital letterforms- definitely worth a look at the full alphabet here.  Meanwhile, here are a few examples…

Further Developments Upon an Art Deco Theme

We’ve now had the opportunity to do some more work upon our ‘Belle Jardin’ project and to refine the letterforms developed so far in the light of our own further reflection and feedback received.  This Art Deco inspired project seems to have attracted quite a lot of interest, so we’re moving it to the head of our development queue.

Here’s a more recent sampler, showing upper and lower case letter forms as well as an extensive range of stylistic alternates.  Have fun spotting the differences and just where things have evolved! 🙂

Do let us know your thoughts…

Belle_Jardin-1 Belle_Jardin-2

 

 

The Blob

Here’s’ a design we’ve been experiementing for ages, arising out of an office conversation about whether it could be done.  Basically it’s a weighty didone, where each letterform incorporates some portion of a large spherical dot (the blob itself).  This ongoing experiment is finally producing some pleasing results, very pleasing, in fact.  So here’s a small sampling of what’s been produced so far.  One thing, can anyone think of a name?

Tulyar

Black Letter Fantasy

Here’s the latest progress on Merrivaux.  We now have a full set o capital letterforms sketched out.  Merrivaux is not a revival of an historical blackletter, but a pure work of our own imagining.  There is also a deliberate family relationship to one of our earlier designs, the Roman display family Merrivale. We will report more progress in the near future…

Merrivaux2

More Chubbliness…

We expect to release our ‘Chubbly’ family soon and are just putting the finishing touches to its final two members-  Chubbly Outline and Chubbly Outline 2.  Here’s a small taster in the meantime:

We think that these faces compiment the big friendly letterforms of the chubbly family very well.