The Millerstown Typefaces

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Millerstown is full of that solid, 19th Century, transatlantic spirit of enterprise. It is an all capitals face, decorative but clear and legible, ideal for signage, posters and banners.

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For that weathered look…

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Saspirillo Fizz has been put through our (not quite) patented ‘fizzing’ process, in order to give it that weathered look of heavily used type.

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Work Finished on a Range of Tuscan Typefaces…

… and here’s one of them.

We really went all out on this one – Sasparillo is an ‘extreme’ Tuscan face, with reversed emphasis, by which we mean the horizontals are far heavier than the verticals.

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Fourth of July

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As previewed a few days ago, our Independence Day release, especially for our American clients is now available on  Myfonts and Fontspring.

Tuscaloosa is a classic American ‘Wild West‘ Tuscan typeface-we thought it would make a suitable Independence Day tribute to our many American clients.  It’s ideal for wherever that ‘Western‘ feel is wanted.  Posters, signage, the sides of stagecoaches etc… Three faces are offered, a pristine and sharp regular form, a somewhat distressed ‘Rustic‘ face and the rather more distressed ‘Extremely Rustic’.  So why not mosey on down the saloon with Tuscaloosa!

Ambiance (or Postcard Fun)

We thought we’d try our hand at some ‘period’ postcard images so here are some experiments into how a typeface can compliment the ambiance of a place.

First Tudor architecture from Lincoln in the UK is complimented by the traditional qualities of Morover and Corton:

Here’s St Peter’s at Wolverhampton, set off by the formal elegance of Vectis.

Now for a move up-tempo and another church, as Haymer says hello from ‘Swinging’ London with the recognisable profile of St Pauls:

Finally, a move across the Atlantic, but back in time a little as Zenia brings the new York of the 30s to life: